Coursera | Leadership and Emotional Intelligence

Week 3 >> Graded Quiz >>  Leadership and Emotional Intelligence

Week 3 >> Graded Quiz >>  Leadership and Emotional Intelligence

1. What should a negotiator do when presented with an unacceptable proposal?

  • Immediately reject the proposal
  • Find several things wrong with the proposal and give reasons why it won’t work
  • Ask several questions about the proposal
  • Ignore the proposal and present his or her own proposal instead

2. Mary demonstrates her concern for the employees and manages by consistently giving in to their suggestions or ideas. Usually her approach is that whatever her people want is fine with her. So it is rare for Mary to challenge or turn down any employee request. What would be the best descriptor for her style of conflict resolution?

  • Accommodating
  • Competition
  • Avoidance
  • Collaboration

3. What is NOT TRUE for a constructive response to conflict?

  • Trying to understand the other person’s point of view
  • Consider the pros and cons of a situation
  • Takings steps to break a deadlock
  • Responding quickly and decisively

4. As a team member, Gita is very sincere, efficient and hard working. Girish is her supervisor. He has been delegating tasks to her in light of her excellent performance. A few days back, even as Gita has been working hard and juggling her numerous responsibilities, Girish called her and gave her a couple of large and urgent tasks. Gita has been at a loss wondering how she can manage these additional tasks in addition to her existing ones. How do you think she should approach Girish to have this difficult conversation?

  • “Girish you are being very insensitive. Why do you think I should accept a task which is not even a part of my role description?”
  • Politely decline the tasks given by Girish.
  • “These are the existing projects in which I am involved in. Please advise which of the projects can be disregarded in terms of priority, to accommodate the new tasks”
  • “Last May also just prior to my short vacation you had given me additional tasks and you have a tendency to overburden me with additional tasks”

5. What would be the first thing to do when approaching a conflict situation with another person?

  • Assertively but diplomatically state your perspective
  • Brainstorm possible solutions to the problem
  • Force your point of view
  • Listen and ask questions to gain a clearer understanding of the issues involved

6. Which of the following statements will you DISAGREE with?

  • Inappropriate response to conflict intensifies the problem and sows seeds of future conflicts
  • Collaborating’ or ‘Integrating’ style is the best approach to any conflict
  • In a conflict, you need to focus on both building relationships and finding ways to achieve outcomes where both parties win as much as possible
  • If you’re aware of your default patterns to conflict management, you can pay attention to whether they are working for you, and explore alternatives

7. In his technology firm, Kris was required to design and implement a complex, new initiative that was expected to create turbulence in different areas and drag people out of their comfort zones. With his team members consisting of young, technology professionals (who looked up to him), he talked about why the change was necessary and how the change presented exciting new challenges. He presented hard data and analysis on why the chosen approach will work best to attain the objectives.
He was heavily dependent on the support of his peers for the success of the initiative. To gain peer support, he involved them in working out the details of pilot project. He shared the results on a regular basis. He took time to socialize and get to know others. Through informal communication, he built trust and commitment.
In the organization, there were old timers, who felt that they would lose their status and position as a result of the proposed change. They were fearful, uncertain and anxious. Kris presented logical arguments to them on how the change will benefit the organization.
The senior leaders were concerned about the successful implementation of the complex change initiative. Kris framed his key arguments keeping in mind the senior management concerns and perspectives. He considered their needs, appropriately positioned his proposals and presented his ideas in an impactful manner.
Question: Which influence tactic did Kris use with members of his technical team?

  • Interpersonal Awareness
  • Logical Persuasion
  • Organization Awareness and Coalition Building
  • Coercion

8. In his technology firm, Kris was required to design and implement a complex, new initiative that was expected to create turbulence in different areas and drag people out of their comfort zones. With his team members consisting of young, technology professionals (who looked up to him), he talked about why the change was necessary and how the change presented exciting new challenges. He presented hard data and analysis on why the chosen approach will work best to attain the objectives.
He was heavily dependent on the support of his peers for the success of the initiative. To gain peer support, he involved them in working out the details of pilot project. He shared the results on a regular basis. He took time to socialize and get to know others. Through informal communication, he built trust and commitment.
In the organization, there were old timers, who felt that they would lose their status and position as a result of the proposed change. They were fearful, uncertain and anxious. Kris presented logical arguments to them on how the change will benefit the organization.
The senior leaders were concerned about the successful implementation of the complex change initiative. Kris framed his key arguments keeping in mind the senior management concerns and perspectives. He considered their needs, appropriately positioned his proposals and presented his ideas in an impactful manner.
Question: Which influence tactic did Kris employ in his approach to obtain buy-in from his peer group?

  • Relationship building
  • Empowerment
  • Logical persuasion
  • Common Vision

9. In his technology firm, Kris was required to design and implement a complex, new initiative that was expected to create turbulence in different areas and drag people out of their comfort zones. With his team members consisting of young, technology professionals (who looked up to him), he talked about why the change was necessary and how the change presented exciting new challenges. He presented hard data and analysis on why the chosen approach will work best to attain the objectives.
He was heavily dependent on the support of his peers for the success of the initiative. To gain peer support, he involved them in working out the details of pilot project. He shared the results on a regular basis. He took time to socialize and get to know others. Through informal communication, he built trust and commitment.
In the organization, there were old timers, who felt that they would lose their status and position as a result of the proposed change. They were fearful, uncertain and anxious. Kris presented logical arguments to them on how the change will benefit the organization.
The senior leaders were concerned about the successful implementation of the complex change initiative. Kris framed his key arguments keeping in mind the senior management concerns and perspectives. He considered their needs, appropriately positioned his proposals and presented his ideas in an impactful manner.
Question: Which of the following statements will you DISAGREE with?

  • His approach of using the influence tactic of ‘Interpersonal Awareness’ with the senior leaders was appropriate
  • For the success of the new initiative, Kris was dependent on the support of the peer functions; so it was necessary for Kris to influence his peers and gain their buy-in
  • His approach with old-timers (who had emotional resistance) was appropriate
  • His approach with old-timers (who had emotional resistance) was inappropriate

10. Which of the following statements will you DISAGREE with

  • Influence involves “selling” your ideas to the decision maker, and so you have to take responsibility to appropriately convince or educate the decision maker
  • Influential managers invest in building their personal and professional credibility over a period of time
  • As peers tend to compete for promotions, influential managers don’t waste much time on horizontal communication and cross-functional relationships
  • For effective influence, you have to know your audience, and keep your communication simple, and make it real and tangible

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